beazleydoty Casa Jasmina at Beazley Designs of the Year exhibition | Design Museum, London

Casa Jasmina is proud to announce that our project has been selected for the 9th edition of Breazley Designs of the Year exhibition at Design Museum, London! Starting November 24th, 2016 and until February 19th, 2017, a selection of Casa Jasmina projects will be on display. The exhibition is part of the Museum’s re-opening programme in its beautiful new location in Kensington.

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Casa Jasmina is one of the 70 nominees for the Designs of the Year Awards, competing in the Digital category alongside with other amazing projects.
It’s a great honor to be part of the exhibition among so many brilliant, beautiful and bizarre projects: an augmented reality device that allows you to see the world through the eyes of an animal, a moth design generator, a do-it-yourself surgery tool and many more, including Fondazione Prada (Milan) and the design of David Bowie’s last album, Blackstar.

Beazley Designs of the Year has always been an initiative which looks forward to innovative forms of design and new ways to conceive arts:

Beazley Designs of the Year celebrates design that promotes or delivers change, enables access, extends design practice or captures the spirit of the year. Someday the other museums will be showing this stuff.

The projects hosted at the exhibition are, so to say, the art of the future. There’s no better place, then, for Casa Jasmina, the house of the future!

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If you happen to be in London during the next months, don’t miss out on the opportunity to visit the exhibition. For opening hours, booking your tickets and more info you can visit the Design Museum website.
And don’t forget to cross your fingers and wish us luck for the Award!

Maker Faire Rome 2016
IMG_5030The school kids were sitting on the pavement at the Roman fairground, eating their sandwiches, supervised by a few teachers and behaving really well.
   They all came to the Maker Faire to learn  to do something with their hands, their days, their lives. Because the message from the press and the organizers is insistent and simple: the new Italy has to make its way in this world starting from scratch.
  Maker Faire In Rome is in its fourth edition, and it is huge, growing in fame and audience. It has outgrown downtown Rome and is off in a genuine fairground: it is the biggest Maker Faire in Europe, despite, or maybe because of,  its very Italian regional character.
  This year a Maker Faire jury  gave away the brand-new “R.O.M.A Prize” — a lavish 100 000 euros to the best Maker Faire project.  Out of 2000 entries, ten were selected and publicly presented. The  prize was won by  Talking Hands, an instrumented glove that instantly  translates the silent sign language of the hearing-impaired into audible spoken words.
  This inclusive and kind-hearted project was judged to have more “social impact” than its rivals, which were mostly start ups, one-man garage projects,  and Internet platforms. Despite its huge size, Maker Faire is still a rather strange event with an electronic frontier sensibility.   Any American event of that scale would have had hundreds of merchandise booths and much bigger food trucks.
Maker Faire has begun to attract its own kind of celebrities, such as Grant Imahara, a TV star of the  “MythBusters” series.   This American TV show, where special-effects experts investigated folk mysteries and often blew them up on screen, was a famous demonstration of the Maker Movement’s technological populism.  The American celebrity was happy to encourage his many Italian fans before rushing off to admire Rome.
In Italy’s fertile cultural circumstances, a “Maker Faire” becomes two thousand European craft and technology projects spread across 100000 square meters.  It’s a display of  “The Future of Everything,” echoing the message of the recent gala issue of WIRED magazine, as guest-edited by the President of the United States.  Barack Obama’s popularity is soaring as he departs after two terms, and Obama exits power as a forward-looking geek technocrat, telling the voters that it’s a fine thing to be alive today with so many publicly accessible technologies.
Italy has its own ways of dealing with public technologies, and the  Fablabs growing in cities across Italy have a campanilismo feeling of Italian urban patriotism.  Where Americans might “do it yourself,” Italians will “do it in town.”  Professor Neil Gershenfeld of MIT, the original creator of the “Fab Lab” concept, delivered a stirring lecture at Maker Faire, where he proudly described the way his digital fabrication laboratories have integrated themselves into European “Smart City” politics.  Barcelona is probably Prof. Gershenfeld’s star pupil, but Rome’s Maker Faire is so big and charismatic that it attracts every Fab Lab in all of Italy, and even Makers from outside the Europe Union.
Maker Faire Rome is like a catalog of shared open source research and development.  It’s impossible to summarize an event that includes laser-cut plywood wheelchairs,  3d printed baby incubators,   augmented reality zebra crossings for overcrowded streets, artificial ventilators for the polluted air of New Delhi, and paste-on digital microphones that can turn any physical object into a musical instrument.  It’s clear, though, that the vitality here is not about conventional commercial schemes.  It’s about human need — gizmos to console children who fear the dark, and arcane kitchen gear to defend nourishment from industrial fast food.
Casa Jasmina from Torino had its own Maker Faire installation, designed and constructed like a fairy tale castle.  This exhibit mostly displayed Maker prototypes and experiments, although Casa Jasmina is a genuine physical residence that can meet the needs of real people, the guests who eat, sleep, drink and experiment there.
Without vision the people perish, and the best way to have a truly great idea is to have a thousand exciting ideas and to enjoy getting rid of  all the silly ones.
 The daily life of tomorrow does not require genius or gigantic funding schemes.  It requires sincerity and engagement, an honest willingness to place our own bare human hands right onto the quivering substance of the 3Dprinted plastic dream.
 If we ever alight on Mars some day, we’ll have to arrive on that alien surface without shipping up dismal tons of our contemporary hardware.    I don’t  understand  everything that Neil Gershenfeld declaims, but a vision that’s merely a spreadsheet, a budget and a checklist, that’s not a vision I would share — I want a real one like his.
residency 3-01 Maker Faire Home, residency #3|”Daisy”, an interactive smog detector and “Il Guastafeste” a connected funny silencer

For this third residency period, Casa Jasmina is hosting two Italian makers: Valentina Lapolla from Tuscany and Ivan Iovine from Italian Switzerland.

Let’s start with Valentina

Valentina is a visual artist, living and working in Prato (IT). After a degree in environmental engineering and a PHD in applied statistics, she joined SenzaDimoraFissa group of artists and activists, founded by the photographer Andrea Abati. Based on a conceptual footing, her work is developed in an ongoing dialogue with reality and make use of many different media. Some of her recent projects are based on open source electronics.
Her work has been shown at Fondazione Fotografia (Modena, IT), Museo Pecci (Prato, IT), Casa Masaccio (S.Giovanni Valdarno, IT), Tenuta dello Scompiglio (Lucca, IT), Dryphoto arte contemporanea (Prato, IT), Museo de la Universidad de Alicante (Spain) among other venues. She won the Fondazione Fotografia Special Italia 2010 Award, the Portali dello Scompiglio Award and Special Mention at Un’opera per il castello Award (Naple, IT). For Maker Faire Home, she is working on Daisy is a paper flower that helps us to easily and clearly visualize air quality values.

 

The more Daisy is open, the more air is clean; the more air is polluted, the more Daisy is closed.
I like the idea of transforming an ephemeral and beautiful decoration into a visualizer of such a relevant issue.
With the precious help and expertise of Casa Jasmina team I’m sure we will be able to develop an enjoyable and helpful object.

Ivan Iovine, born in Ticino 26 years ago from Italian parents. He studied IT Business in Bellinzona (Swiss Diplom), after that, he choosed to move on and try a new life experience in Germany, first in Munich, where he worked one year as web developer, then in Frankfurt, where he actually live. In this last step of his life, he decided to start a new study where his actual IT competence can be combined with his creative skills. He is actually studying Interactive Media Design at Hochschule Darmstadt.

Ivan is working on “Il Guastafeste. He describes it as:

Il Guastafeste is a system that interacts directly with audio and lights devices presents at home. The system is composed by a sound sensor and a trumpet form object. The sound sensor is located near the house door, it detects how many Decibel coming from the flat, if the amount of decibel after 22 o’clock is more than the amount of decibel defined by law, the system will adjust automatically the volume and send a feedback to the trumpet (located in the living room), the trumpet will send an audio and visual (printed statement) feedback to the user. If the user ignore the system and set the volume louder, il Guastafeste will react consequently, turning off the sound system and lights present in the living room, breaking the party.

Ivan also says:

I consider Casa Jasmina one of the greatest and most interesting project in the Internet of Things / Home Automation field, i’m very exiting to see how this project grow up, especially in relation of the Airbnb Project and what kind of ideas you will cooking up right now! For me is a great opportunity to join you, explore your world and understand your philosophy!

Working hard using DIY techniques and Genuino MKR1000, they have one week to finish their prototypes. Come to discover this nice and amazing projects at Maker Faire Rome from 14th to 16th October 2016.